organic cultivation


Agriculture was practised for thousands of years without the use of artificial chemicals. Artificial fertilizers were first created during the mid-19th century. These early fertilisers were cheap, powerful, and easy to transport in bulk. Similar advances occurred in chemical pesticides in the 1940s, leading to the decade being referred to as the ‘pesticide era’. These new agricultural techniques, while beneficial in the short term, had serious longer term side effects such as soil compaction, erosion, and declines in overall soil fertility, along with health concerns about toxic chemicals entering the food supply. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, soil biology scientists began to seek ways to remedy these side effects while still maintaining higher production. ORGANIC CULTIVATION.

Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment and promote fair relationships and a good quality of life for all involved…

 

organic tomato cultivation with vermi compost

Organic farming is an alternative agricultural system which originated early in the 20th century in reaction to rapidly changing farming practices. Organic farming continues to be developed by various organic agriculture organisations today. Here over at Monchasha we are also trying to produce vegetables which is 100% organic.

cauliflower, cabbage cultivation with green compost & cow manure

Research :: It relies on fertilisers of organic origin such as compost, manure, green manure, and bone meal and places emphasis on techniques such as crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest control, mixed cropping and the fostering of insect predators are encouraged.

Organic Cultivation is one of the important base of “monchasha”. Organic farming is a method of crop and livestock production that involves much more than choosing not to use pesticides, fertilisers, genetically modified organisms, antibiotics and growth hormones.

friends of monchasha with the organic crops

Since 1990 the market for organic food and other products has grown rapidly, reaching $63 billion worldwide in 2012. This demand has driven a similar increase in organically managed farmland that grew from 2001 to 2011 at a compounding rate of 8.9% per annum. As of 2011, approximately 37,000,000 hectares (91,000,000 acres) worldwide were farmed organically, representing approximately 0.9 percent of total world farmland.

 

yes mama! i like to have these

 

wow! very nice. it is better than my school.

Organic farming encourages Crop diversity. The science of agro-ecology has revealed the benefits of polyculture (multiple crops in the same space), which is often employed in organic farming. Planting a variety of vegetable crops supports a wider range of beneficial insects, soil microorganisms, and other factors that add up to overall farm health. Crop diversity helps environments thrive and protects species from going extinct.

Result we got with organic compost without chemical pesticides and fertilisers

Result we got with organic compost without chemical pesticides and fertilisers

Result we got with organic compost without chemical pesticides and fertilisers

Result we got with organic compost without chemical pesticides and fertilisers

Organic Cultivation2

Result we got with organic compost without chemical pesticides and fertilisers

GO GREEN !! GO ORGANIC !!

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